Master Blaster (Jammin)….

As the great man Stevie Wonder once said “It’s hotter than July” – and that’s not too bad for the start of June. The first fruits are starting to ripen and the huerto (veggie patch) is getting greener by the day. The first of our trees to give fruit is the níspero (loquat). This year it has produced not only more, but larger fruit than previous years. This could be as a result of the wetter-than-normal spring or just that the trees are more established. Either way you look at it, we’ve had more fruit than we can eat. We’ve been eating the fruit straight from the tree for the last couple of weeks – I have even been giving bags away to the owner of one of the bars in the village, as I know that they’re his favourite. Now that the fruit is maturing and in danger of spoiling there are only one (or two) things left to do with them; and we all know what that means, don’t we? Jam!

What you will need: a very large saucepan (or preserving pan), scales, a bucket of water, a bowl/bucket for the skins.

I had 5kg of loquats – you may adjust the recipe accordingly. Firstly wash the loquats then leave them in a bucket/washing-up bowl of water.

Peel the loquats, putting the skins in another bowl. Remove the stone(s) and leave them in the water. The flesh of the fruit should be weighed before putting into the saucepan with the juice of 2-3 lemons. I ended up with 2.75kg of fruit. Add a little water (to prevent the fruit from sticking to the pan) and simmer for about 20 mins – or until the fruit is well softened.

Remove from the heat and add 2.25kg of sugar and a knob of butter (optional). Return to the heat and boil rapidly at between 94° and 104°C for 20-30 minutes – or until a setting point is reached. Jar and seal.

 

You should be left over with 1.7kg of skins – which I gave straight to the chickens (there’s no quicker way of making compost than putting it through an animal) – and 880gm of stones. Click This link to see an older post about what I do with the stones – trust me – you’ll want to know this!

There you have it – home made products with no waste – and you wondered what I did all day up here, eh?

14 thoughts on “Master Blaster (Jammin)….

  1. Brilliant my nispero tree is bending under the weight and I was thinking about making jam so I don’t need to look up a recipe now! I do remember from last time I made it how annoying and fiddly the peeling and de stoning was though which is why I haven’t made any for a few years!

    • Thank you, Diana! Yes – it is a faff – all the peeling and de stoning. It is less messy using the water, and it makes peeling a bit easier. It still took me over an hour to do it but it’s a very relaxing way to pass time and ponder 🙂

  2. OOHHH you’ve been a busy girl 🙂

    Down on the south coast, our Nispero crop is over now, but I didn’t make any jam as they are not my favourite fruits.

    • Thank you, Marianne – It keeps me out of trouble 🙂

      They are a bit tricky to eat – with all the peeling and stoning – and have a distinct flavour which men seem to prefer (odd!) 🙂

    • Thank you, Molly! I hate to see anything going to waste and I’m always looking for more ways to use the fruits that are native to this area to get the most out of them. 🙂

    • Thank you, Matthew! The níspero does seem to be the Marmite of fruits! You are lucky to be perfectly placed, geographically, for avocados – a favourite of mine, also – we are too far inland for them to have any success in growing them (we tried – and failed), and they are expensive to buy. However you now have me thinking…………..avocado jam?……. 🙂

  3. You forgot to mention that by the time you have finished cleaning the loqarts, you end up with brown fingers.

    • Nope! Didn’t forget, didn’t get black nor brown fingers – maybe I should have been clearer about peeling the fruit ‘in’ the water.
      So sorry that you ended up with dirty fingers 🙁
      How did you get on with the rest of it?

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